Translation: October 12, 1913 – Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa.

The following text is a translation of page 7 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from October 12, 1913. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa. By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig  From “Building and Housing”

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa.
By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig                                        From “Building and Housing”

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 4

     The south of our great colony on the Indian Ocean is interesting in every respect. The Ruvuma, a large river that borders Portuguese East Africa, forms with the protected mid-coastal area, a region of young earth deposits, which now confront us in the form of steep, sloping plateaus. Of them, the most significant is the Makonde plateau between the Ruvuma and the Lukuledi, with a size of some two-thirds the Kingdom of Saxony; others, like the Noto and the Rondo plateau, are smaller. Anthropologically, the region accommodates a relatively large number of tribes and fragmented tribes. The Makonde are indigenous to the plateau of the same name. In olden times, the Wamuera migrated north from the Lukuledi. The Ngindo, Ndonde, Wamatambwe, and the pseudo-Ngoni in the deep Rovumatal vary from the warlike, to Kaffir related Ngoni tribes on the east bank of the Nyasa, up to small shattered remnants of tribes. The Makua and Yao are essentially non-native peoples from the southern regions who immigrated over the course of the last 60 to 70 years.

    This diversity is also evident in the dwellings and in the complex of the settlements. The oldest form of house is without a doubt the cylindric hut with a cone-shaped roof as seen in Figure 3…

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

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