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1913

The following text is a translation of page 7 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from October 12, 1913. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa. By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig  From “Building and Housing”

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa.
By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig                                        From “Building and Housing”

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 4

     The south of our great colony on the Indian Ocean is interesting in every respect. The Ruvuma, a large river that borders Portuguese East Africa, forms with the protected mid-coastal area, a region of young earth deposits, which now confront us in the form of steep, sloping plateaus. Of them, the most significant is the Makonde plateau between the Ruvuma and the Lukuledi, with a size of some two-thirds the Kingdom of Saxony; others, like the Noto and the Rondo plateau, are smaller. Anthropologically, the region accommodates a relatively large number of tribes and fragmented tribes. The Makonde are indigenous to the plateau of the same name. In olden times, the Wamuera migrated north from the Lukuledi. The Ngindo, Ndonde, Wamatambwe, and the pseudo-Ngoni in the deep Rovumatal vary from the warlike, to Kaffir related Ngoni tribes on the east bank of the Nyasa, up to small shattered remnants of tribes. The Makua and Yao are essentially non-native peoples from the southern regions who immigrated over the course of the last 60 to 70 years.

    This diversity is also evident in the dwellings and in the complex of the settlements. The oldest form of house is without a doubt the cylindric hut with a cone-shaped roof as seen in Figure 3…

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The following text is a translation of page 7 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from July 20, 1913. The translation is by Alex Russell.

The burial of the Empress-Dowager of China in Peking. 1. The imperial visor. 2. The coffin in the funeral procession. 3. Catafalque with flowers

The burial of the Empress-Dowager of China in Peking. 1. The imperial visor. 2. The coffin in the funeral procession. 3. Catafalque with flowers

From the Breslauer centenary exhibit: The man-made lake and festival hall, in which the great pageant of Gerhart Hauptmann was staged by Prof. Reinhard with 2000 participants. Right, the building from the historical exposition.

From the Breslauer centenary exhibit: The man-made lake and festival hall, in which the great pageant of Gerhart Hauptmann was staged by Prof. Reinhard with 2000 participants. Right, the building from the historical exposition.

The galleon figure from the new Hamburg steamship “Emperor”. The bronze imperial heraldic eagle is casted from a design by Prof. Bruno Krause in Berlin. Resting on a giant globe, the eagle measures almost 20 feet from the beak to the ends of its powerful wings.

The galleon figure from the new Hamburg steamship “Emperor”. The bronze imperial heraldic eagle is casted from a design by Prof. Bruno Krause in Berlin. Resting on a giant globe, the eagle measures almost 20 feet from the beak to the ends of its powerful wings

In the peaceful secluded woods on the declivity of the Wanglong Shan marshes, west of Peking, a sixth grave will soon be added to the five imperial graves of the Manchu dynasty; that of the Empress Dowager Longyu (Feb. 22 1913), wife of the deceased Emperor Guangxu (Nov. 1908). Emperor Guangxu is often called a martyr to the throne. Even more of the martyrdom was borne by the silent, selfless Longyu, who was almost always a plaything of strange vagaries. And peculiarly the burial of this simple, devoted woman, ever lingering in the background as Empress, Regent, and mother, has been turned into a grandiose assembly in Peking, one that on such occasion no other woman in China has been bestowed.

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