Archive

Baltimore

The following text is a translation of page 1 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from May 14, 1916. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Der Deutsche Correspondent - May 14, 1916 - Front Page

 

To acquaint the Germans newly arrived in this country with the social and political
conditions in the United States; to familiarize them with their duties towards their adopted
country and with the rights conferred upon them by the Constitution; to keep alive and foster
their love for German social life and German song; to be a bond between them and their
fatherland so that Mother Germania shall not be forgotten; to impress their children with the
value of cultivating interest in the language  of their fathers—this was the purpose which
inspired the founding of the German Correspondent; this is the purpose of the paper now,
after seventy­-five years; and this will remain its purpose in the future.

(This issue covers the founding and history of the German Correspondent. Here is an excerpt. The full translation can be found at the end of this post.)

     In its 75 years of existence, the German Correspondent has always promoted the political teachings of Thomas Jefferson and represented the principles of the Democratic Party. One of the most meaningful battles that the paper has led was the defense of the foreign-born against ignorant attitudes in the 1850s. It is a similar battle as that which the Correspondent now leads against the hostilities to which those of American-German ancestry and all Germans have been exposed since the outbreak of the European war. During the civil war, the Correspondent remained devoted to the old democratic axiom of the inviolability of states’ rights; accepting, however, that the preservation of the Union must stand above the interests of the individual states. The German Correspondent has always exerted an influence on state and municipal politics, and the German vote was crucial for various elections. To it we owe the introduction of German language classes in Baltimore public schools. The German Correspondent has strived to promote German social and intellectual life in the city and the state. Thus it took the operative part in the founding of the Independent Citizens Association of Maryland (Unabhängigen Bürgervereins von Maryland), which has a significant influence today in the political and social world. The business world, in particular the great Finance-Institute, has also come to appreciate the value of the German Correspondent, where they are able to make contact with a substantial number of desirable clients.

Business Dept. Staff

Business Dept. Staff

Editorial Staff

Editorial Staff

Typesetter Staff

Typesetter Staff

Press Staff

Press Staff

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

Advertisements

The following text is a translation of page 1 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from February 9, 1904. The translation is by Alex Russell.

*Note – Picture quality is lacking. Some photos have been edited to bring out better definition. In some cases there wasn’t much that could be done.

Temporary Bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent, Following the fire at the Raine building, which housed the printers and bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent, a temporary bureau has been established in the Klemm building on 219 North Calvert St. We request that our valuable readers, as well as the general public, send any advertisements or news there.

Temporary Bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent,
Following the fire at the Raine building, which housed the printers and bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent, a temporary bureau has been established in the Klemm building on 219 North Calvert St. We request that our valuable readers, as well as the general public, send any advertisements or news there.

Baltimore in Ruins.

Entire downtown burnt out.

More than 100 residential blocks and all electrical installations destroyed.

Damages amount to more than 250 million dollars. Banks destroyed, insurance companies paralyzed. City under martial law. All militia regiments and federal servicemen on duty. Gov. Warfield decrees a 10 day public holiday. Federal, state, and local aid requested. Aid arrives from New York, Philadelphia. Fire tackled after 28 hours. Many injured and only one fatality. Debris blasted with dynamite.

   The world has not seen a calamity like that which befell Baltimore on Sunday since the destruction of Carthage and Rome. The incineration of Chicago 30 years ago does not compare to Baltimore’s fiery disaster, where wooden houses burned and damages amounted to almost $50 million. Here, the proudest of business establishments were turned to rubble and ashes in less than 24 hours, and will require $50 million alone to rebuild, while the loss of goods and merchandise will approach an amount of $200 million.

   The duty of the federal government would now be to offer assistance. The authorization of a $50,000,000 loan (15 years at 3%) for purposes of lending would help the city immediately get back on its feet. This sum could at the very least rebuild the buildings of those businesses that were brought to the verge of ruin on account of the fire. Businesses could then use their insurance money to purchase new merchandise.

   The human mind stands still at the sight of the sea of debris that stretches from Liberty St. in the west to Jones Falls in the east, from Lexington St. in the north down to Pratt St. west of Light St. and over to the Harbor East of Light St. in the south. In this district stood nearly all of the banks, import companies, commission houses, bureau offices, newspaper offices and wholesale businesses, buildings that appeared to be built for eternity. Not one morning paper could be published yesterday. The roaring sea of flames reached the newspaper bureaus before they could go to press. As the morning advanced, the horrific force had nearly completed its work of destruction, the water of the harbor halted its advance. It sprang onto “the Block” and also over the Jones Falls, however the firemen from New York were able to halt the flames. The cremated district encompass 155 acres of land.

fire_ill_1 fire_ill_2 fire_ill_3 fire_4 fire_5 fire_7 fire_8 fire_9 fire_10 fire_11 fire_12 fire_13

An ironic advertisement found within this very same issue.

An ironic advertisement found within this very same issue.

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.