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The following text is a translation of page 1 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from May 14, 1916. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Der Deutsche Correspondent - May 14, 1916 - Front Page

 

To acquaint the Germans newly arrived in this country with the social and political
conditions in the United States; to familiarize them with their duties towards their adopted
country and with the rights conferred upon them by the Constitution; to keep alive and foster
their love for German social life and German song; to be a bond between them and their
fatherland so that Mother Germania shall not be forgotten; to impress their children with the
value of cultivating interest in the language  of their fathers—this was the purpose which
inspired the founding of the German Correspondent; this is the purpose of the paper now,
after seventy­-five years; and this will remain its purpose in the future.

(This issue covers the founding and history of the German Correspondent. Here is an excerpt. The full translation can be found at the end of this post.)

     In its 75 years of existence, the German Correspondent has always promoted the political teachings of Thomas Jefferson and represented the principles of the Democratic Party. One of the most meaningful battles that the paper has led was the defense of the foreign-born against ignorant attitudes in the 1850s. It is a similar battle as that which the Correspondent now leads against the hostilities to which those of American-German ancestry and all Germans have been exposed since the outbreak of the European war. During the civil war, the Correspondent remained devoted to the old democratic axiom of the inviolability of states’ rights; accepting, however, that the preservation of the Union must stand above the interests of the individual states. The German Correspondent has always exerted an influence on state and municipal politics, and the German vote was crucial for various elections. To it we owe the introduction of German language classes in Baltimore public schools. The German Correspondent has strived to promote German social and intellectual life in the city and the state. Thus it took the operative part in the founding of the Independent Citizens Association of Maryland (Unabhängigen Bürgervereins von Maryland), which has a significant influence today in the political and social world. The business world, in particular the great Finance-Institute, has also come to appreciate the value of the German Correspondent, where they are able to make contact with a substantial number of desirable clients.

Business Dept. Staff

Business Dept. Staff

Editorial Staff

Editorial Staff

Typesetter Staff

Typesetter Staff

Press Staff

Press Staff

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

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The following text is a translation of page 7 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from October 12, 1913. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa. By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig  From “Building and Housing”

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa.
By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig                                        From “Building and Housing”

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 4

     The south of our great colony on the Indian Ocean is interesting in every respect. The Ruvuma, a large river that borders Portuguese East Africa, forms with the protected mid-coastal area, a region of young earth deposits, which now confront us in the form of steep, sloping plateaus. Of them, the most significant is the Makonde plateau between the Ruvuma and the Lukuledi, with a size of some two-thirds the Kingdom of Saxony; others, like the Noto and the Rondo plateau, are smaller. Anthropologically, the region accommodates a relatively large number of tribes and fragmented tribes. The Makonde are indigenous to the plateau of the same name. In olden times, the Wamuera migrated north from the Lukuledi. The Ngindo, Ndonde, Wamatambwe, and the pseudo-Ngoni in the deep Rovumatal vary from the warlike, to Kaffir related Ngoni tribes on the east bank of the Nyasa, up to small shattered remnants of tribes. The Makua and Yao are essentially non-native peoples from the southern regions who immigrated over the course of the last 60 to 70 years.

    This diversity is also evident in the dwellings and in the complex of the settlements. The oldest form of house is without a doubt the cylindric hut with a cone-shaped roof as seen in Figure 3…

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

ny_times_1891

After doing a keyword search for “Frederick Raine Der Deutsche Correspondent” I found this article on the New York Times website from 1891. This article was written in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Der Deutsche Correspondent and the 70th birthday of the founder, owner, and editor of the German-language Newspaper, Frederick Raine. The article reads:

A Newspaper’s Golden Jubliee.
The “German Correspondent” Celebrates An Anniversary.

Baltimore, May 13. — The German Correspondent celebrated to-day its fiftieth anniversary, also the seventieth anniversary of the birthday of its founder, editor, proprietor, Col. Frederick Raine. A special edition of the German Correspondent perpetuates in eduring letter press the glories of the semi-centennial and the septuagismal. It is filled with articles by prominent literary men. A handsome souvenir, illustrative of the progress of printing and the march of the years, accompanies this special edition. Cardinal Gibbons, Senator Gorman, Mr. George W. Childs and Mr. M.R. Muckle of the Philadelphia Ledger, Mr. Louis Schade of Washington, the President and Professor of the Johns Hopkins University, German societies, and business men of Baltimore sent letters of congratulation. Cardinal Gibbons wrote as follows:

CARDINAL’S RESIDENCE, BALTIMORE, May 9, 1891. MY DEAR SIR: You will permit me to unite with the English-speaking citizens of Baltimore in tendering to you my cordial congratulations on the approaching golden jubilee of the German Correspondent. It is not often that the founder of a newspaper is spared by Divine Providence, as you have been, to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the establishment of a journal and to receive at the same time the commendations of a discerning public for the judicious and conservative policy which the paper has steadily pursued. I am yours faithfully in Christ.
J. CARD. GIBBONS.

Col. FREDERICK RAINE.
Mr. George W. Childs of the Philadelphia Ledger telegraphed as follow:
Hearty congratulations on your fiftieth anniversary. Wishing you continued health and success.
Your friend,
GEORGE W. CHILDS.

Mayor Robert C. Davidson, as Chairman and a committee called on Col. Raine and presented him with the resolutions passed by both branches of the City Council, congratulatory of the double events celebrated to-day, and extended their felicitations both officially and personally.

Copyright (c) The New York Times

The article can also be viewed here: http://bit.ly/13OcWc