The following text is a translation of page 1 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from February 9, 1904. The translation is by Alex Russell.

*Note – Picture quality is lacking. Some photos have been edited to bring out better definition. In some cases there wasn’t much that could be done.

Temporary Bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent, Following the fire at the Raine building, which housed the printers and bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent, a temporary bureau has been established in the Klemm building on 219 North Calvert St. We request that our valuable readers, as well as the general public, send any advertisements or news there.

Temporary Bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent,
Following the fire at the Raine building, which housed the printers and bureau of the Deutsche Correspondent, a temporary bureau has been established in the Klemm building on 219 North Calvert St. We request that our valuable readers, as well as the general public, send any advertisements or news there.

Baltimore in Ruins.

Entire downtown burnt out.

More than 100 residential blocks and all electrical installations destroyed.

Damages amount to more than 250 million dollars. Banks destroyed, insurance companies paralyzed. City under martial law. All militia regiments and federal servicemen on duty. Gov. Warfield decrees a 10 day public holiday. Federal, state, and local aid requested. Aid arrives from New York, Philadelphia. Fire tackled after 28 hours. Many injured and only one fatality. Debris blasted with dynamite.

   The world has not seen a calamity like that which befell Baltimore on Sunday since the destruction of Carthage and Rome. The incineration of Chicago 30 years ago does not compare to Baltimore’s fiery disaster, where wooden houses burned and damages amounted to almost $50 million. Here, the proudest of business establishments were turned to rubble and ashes in less than 24 hours, and will require $50 million alone to rebuild, while the loss of goods and merchandise will approach an amount of $200 million.

   The duty of the federal government would now be to offer assistance. The authorization of a $50,000,000 loan (15 years at 3%) for purposes of lending would help the city immediately get back on its feet. This sum could at the very least rebuild the buildings of those businesses that were brought to the verge of ruin on account of the fire. Businesses could then use their insurance money to purchase new merchandise.

   The human mind stands still at the sight of the sea of debris that stretches from Liberty St. in the west to Jones Falls in the east, from Lexington St. in the north down to Pratt St. west of Light St. and over to the Harbor East of Light St. in the south. In this district stood nearly all of the banks, import companies, commission houses, bureau offices, newspaper offices and wholesale businesses, buildings that appeared to be built for eternity. Not one morning paper could be published yesterday. The roaring sea of flames reached the newspaper bureaus before they could go to press. As the morning advanced, the horrific force had nearly completed its work of destruction, the water of the harbor halted its advance. It sprang onto “the Block” and also over the Jones Falls, however the firemen from New York were able to halt the flames. The cremated district encompass 155 acres of land.

fire_ill_1 fire_ill_2 fire_ill_3 fire_4 fire_5 fire_7 fire_8 fire_9 fire_10 fire_11 fire_12 fire_13

An ironic advertisement found within this very same issue.

An ironic advertisement found within this very same issue.

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

The following text is a translation of page 4 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from December 25, 1910. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Santa ClausChristmas Outdoors

     “White Christmas.” When mother nature wraps herself as well in festive robes, deep snow covers the ground and the twigs of trees and shrubs glitter and flash as crystalline formations in the shining winter sun, then the human heart is filled with twice the festive joy. The homely and churchly festivity does not suffice this heart. It struts out from the four walls into the outdoors, into toughening, invigorating winter air, where sport and play expand the lungs and strengthen the body. In the northern countries, where Christmas is rooted deeply in the life of the people, only then does Christmas day grant the veritable joy and winter pleasure is afforded to young and old. Kids on sleds, bestowed upon them by Santa Claus (St. Nicholas as he likes to be called) and Knecht Rupprecht, can slide lightening-swift down slick chutes on snow covered hills while the adults are given the opportunity for sleigh parties. Counted among these winter sports are also snowshoeing and skiing.

Weihnachtssport der Jugend

Children’s Christmas games.

Norway is the home of the latter, but skiing has already expanded to the south in the Alpine countries where it has found scores of devoted followers. The skiing here is risky sport, but that is one of its strongest allures. It requires skill and fearlessness, but also cold-bloodedness, for when the skier is suddenly confronted with a yawning chasm.

Die Yorkshirer Weihnachtshasen

Yorkshire Christmas hares.

A concern for the Christmas meal calls the sprightly country people outdoors. The young lads in Yorkshire England rise early in the morning to check their rabbit traps. Master hare hop in their thousands through the forest and fields. Their meat must substitute the goose and turkey at the feast. Luck has smiled on the trapper and with a good haul he starts on his way home.

4

Scandinavian Christmas fisherman.

On the Scandinavian table the Christmas feast cannot be lacking. Wind and weather will not prevent the sprightly from wandering out to the frozen fjord for their feast and retrieving the precious fish through a pounded hole in the ice cover. “Bon Appétit” needs no wishing, because it appears on its own through sport and play in the outdoors.

WeihnachtsbaumFrohe Weihnachten!

Click here for the original German page.

The following text is a translation of page 7 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from October 12, 1913. The translation is by Alex Russell.

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa. By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig  From “Building and Housing”

Dwellings and settlements in south German East Africa.
By Professor Dr. K. Weule in Leipzig                                        From “Building and Housing”

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 4

     The south of our great colony on the Indian Ocean is interesting in every respect. The Ruvuma, a large river that borders Portuguese East Africa, forms with the protected mid-coastal area, a region of young earth deposits, which now confront us in the form of steep, sloping plateaus. Of them, the most significant is the Makonde plateau between the Ruvuma and the Lukuledi, with a size of some two-thirds the Kingdom of Saxony; others, like the Noto and the Rondo plateau, are smaller. Anthropologically, the region accommodates a relatively large number of tribes and fragmented tribes. The Makonde are indigenous to the plateau of the same name. In olden times, the Wamuera migrated north from the Lukuledi. The Ngindo, Ndonde, Wamatambwe, and the pseudo-Ngoni in the deep Rovumatal vary from the warlike, to Kaffir related Ngoni tribes on the east bank of the Nyasa, up to small shattered remnants of tribes. The Makua and Yao are essentially non-native peoples from the southern regions who immigrated over the course of the last 60 to 70 years.

    This diversity is also evident in the dwellings and in the complex of the settlements. The oldest form of house is without a doubt the cylindric hut with a cone-shaped roof as seen in Figure 3…

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

The following text is a translation of page 7 of Der Deutsche Correspondent from July 20, 1913. The translation is by Alex Russell.

The burial of the Empress-Dowager of China in Peking. 1. The imperial visor. 2. The coffin in the funeral procession. 3. Catafalque with flowers

The burial of the Empress-Dowager of China in Peking. 1. The imperial visor. 2. The coffin in the funeral procession. 3. Catafalque with flowers

From the Breslauer centenary exhibit: The man-made lake and festival hall, in which the great pageant of Gerhart Hauptmann was staged by Prof. Reinhard with 2000 participants. Right, the building from the historical exposition.

From the Breslauer centenary exhibit: The man-made lake and festival hall, in which the great pageant of Gerhart Hauptmann was staged by Prof. Reinhard with 2000 participants. Right, the building from the historical exposition.

The galleon figure from the new Hamburg steamship “Emperor”. The bronze imperial heraldic eagle is casted from a design by Prof. Bruno Krause in Berlin. Resting on a giant globe, the eagle measures almost 20 feet from the beak to the ends of its powerful wings.

The galleon figure from the new Hamburg steamship “Emperor”. The bronze imperial heraldic eagle is casted from a design by Prof. Bruno Krause in Berlin. Resting on a giant globe, the eagle measures almost 20 feet from the beak to the ends of its powerful wings

In the peaceful secluded woods on the declivity of the Wanglong Shan marshes, west of Peking, a sixth grave will soon be added to the five imperial graves of the Manchu dynasty; that of the Empress Dowager Longyu (Feb. 22 1913), wife of the deceased Emperor Guangxu (Nov. 1908). Emperor Guangxu is often called a martyr to the throne. Even more of the martyrdom was borne by the silent, selfless Longyu, who was almost always a plaything of strange vagaries. And peculiarly the burial of this simple, devoted woman, ever lingering in the background as Empress, Regent, and mother, has been turned into a grandiose assembly in Peking, one that on such occasion no other woman in China has been bestowed.

Click here for the original German page.

Click here for the full English translation.

MdHS is happy to announce that the digitization of Der Deutsche Correspondent has resumed.

As many of you who have followed this blog may already know, Jennifer Ferretti left the Maryland Historical Society and the Hilgenberg Archive Project back in August last year to attend library school. I stepped in to take over the project at that time, which also happened to be a natural temporary stopping point for the project for a host of reasons: funding, a change in leadership, and news that another institution began working on Der Deutsche Correspondent.*

In May we sent half of our remaining DDC volumes to the Crowley Company in Frederick, Maryland to resume scanning. Since then, we received the good news that funding is in place to complete all remaining volumes. Crowley estimates that it will take six months to complete this stage of the digitization.

In other good news, we recently began working with a new intern, Alexander Russell. Alex is no stranger to the project as he will explain in his greeting below. His duties will range from translation work to acting as a liaison with educators using our DDC files in their classes. Most of all we hope that posts on this blog will become more frequent in the weeks to come. (Joe Tropea)

Please join me in a hearty internet welcome to Alex…

Greetings! My name is Alex Russell. I first became aware of the Hilgenberg Archive/Project in 2010 while studying  at UMBC, where I concentrated in German and Chinese. I was introduced to the paper as part of a translation course, in which we translated short segments articles. After graduating, I approached the Maryland Historical Society to see if the project was still active. Now, I am translating the paper one segment at a time to make it available to the public.

Der Deutsche Correspondent covers such a wide variety of topics and materials: from historic events such as the Mexican Revolution, World War I, and the Suffragette Movement(s); to national news, culture and modernization; to even the most mundane local developments. Der Deutsche Correspondent provides an multifaceted and very human perspective of the German community in not only Baltimore or Maryland, but the East coast and America as a whole. The paper also highlights the rapid developments that mark the period of modernization around the turn of the century, giving rise to industry and technology as we know it today. The paper’s Sunday edition includes focus articles on cultural topics, such as travel, art, music and fashion. Comics, art nouveau illustrations, and photographs will also be uncovered for the first time in over half a century.

Currently, I have access to about 20,000 plus pages from which to translate. Therefore, if any reader is interested in a particular topic, theme, or occurrence, I am certainly able to keep an eye out for that topic as I work to make these historic stories available to the public.

—Alex Russell

*Look for more news on this last point as it develops.

The following text is a translation of the cover of page Der Deutsche Correspondent on June 4, 1914.  The translation is by A. Russell of Edward Larkey’s German language class, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Spring 2011.

Der Deutsche Correspondent, Newspaper. April - June, 1914. Hilgengberg Archive.

IRRIGATION EXPERT

Phoenix, Arizona., June 3rd. – As the inspector of the claims commission, W.A. Ryan, announced, the Federal government has contracted with Sir William Willcocks, the builder of the Aswan dam in Egypt, for the position of consulting engineer for the irrigation bureau of the Federal government. Sir William has already set off for Yuma Arizona on Monday evening for an inspection tour of the entire irrigation complex of the Federal government.

- – -

Short ad notice:
Passports for travel abroad can be taken care of by E. Raine, No. 413, East Baltimore Street, near Custom House Avenue.

- – -

Annexed
Wallis Islands from France
Newest Outrages of the English Suffragettes.

Set buildings on fire in Belfast and in the vicinity of London. – Woman Destroyer of paintings attacks guard of the Dore-Gallery with an axe. – Holloway prison doctor disciplined by horse whip. – Sword fight in Madrid.

- – -

Paris, June 3 – The French colonial office announced the annexing of the Wallis islands in the South Pacific Ocean. The island chain, which contains some 40 square miles of territory and a population of 4500, has been a French protectorate since 1887. Wallis Island lies north east of Fiji.

- – -

ARSONISTS CAUGHT

Belfast, June 3rd – Two suffragettes, Ms. Madge Muir and Ms. Mary Larmour where caught this morning as they set a blaze in an apartment building in the vicinity of Belfast. The two women were sent to the prison for interrogation. The fire only caused minor damage.
- – -
NEWSPAPER EDITOR ATTACKED BY SUFFRAGETTES
Belfast, June 3rd – Today militant Suffragettes attacked Chief Editors of two well known local newspapers that have criticized the campaign of the Suffragettes.

Two well dressed women, one of whom looked huge, entered the office of the “Belfast Telegraph” and were brought to the editing room. Without a word, the larger of the two women went up to Chief Editor Stewart and struck him with a blow from a stool. At the same time, the other dame flung a glue pot at his head.

Both of the women then moved toward the “News Letter Office”, where they made similar attacks on Chief Editor Anderson. The latter is currently under medical treatment.

- – -

MORE VANDALIZING ACTIVITIES FROM THE SUFFRAGETTES

London, June 3rd – A young and elegantly dressed Suffragette carried out a barbarous assault with an axe against a guard of the Dore-Gally. He attempted to restrain her from the destruction of valuable paintings on display.  The lady ruined two paintings and chopped up a third before a guard by the name of Bourlet grabbed her by the arm. Enraged, the vandal then turn against the guard swinging multiple times and inflicting great bodily harm.

Other employees overpowered the woman. Shouting and kicking with all her strength, until she was taken into police custody. The vandal left behind a note in which she declared that the suffragette struggle had, up till this point, behaved much too ladylike. She said: “In order to bring an end to all this, you must ensure justice for us. We would rather die than concede. We have been too ladylike, but as of now we will fight and you can kill us. Others will rise up to take our place. I myself have joined in the fight.”

- – -

NEW PUNISHMENT FOR HOLLOWAY PRISON DOCTOR

London, June 3rd – The Suffragettes have turned their attention anew towards Dr. Francis Edward Forward, the medical official of the Holloway Prison. Two women, who were armed with horse whips, jumped the doctor as he was leaving the prison and administered a hefty punishment. A policeman rushed over and arrested the doctors’ assailants. The latter said her behavior was “a protest against the forced feeding for which this pig is responsible.” Dr. Forward declined to press charges against the women, but the police kept them in custody for disorderly conduct. Dr. Forward was attacked in a similar manner on October 11th of last year.

Today in the early hours, the arson division of the Suffragettes burned down a large cricket pavilion at Carlsfield, southwest of London.
- – -
SWORD FIGHT IN MADRID
Madrid, June 3rd – Yesterday, Antonio Maura, the son of the previous Prime Minister, and the radical Deputy Rodrigo [EL1] Soriano engaged in a sword fight that was fought out with great vehemency. But it lasted only 17 seconds and ended with the injury of both fighters. Maura received a wound on his forehead and Soriano suffered an honorable slash from his ear to his mouth. No reconciliation was negotiated.
The duel was the result of an unsettling scene that occurred in the lobby of the deputy’s chamber on the 27th of May. Maura had attacked Soriano with a cane and with his fists after Soriano called Maura’s father a coward during a debate.

- – -

RULING IN DYNAMITE LAWSUIT STANDS

Chicago June 3rd – The decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the federal circuit, through which Olaf A. Tveitmoe from San Francisco and Richard Houlihan from Chicago requested a new trial in the dynamite cases, was instead reconfirmed today in an opinion delivered by Judge Seaman. The court revoked its own ruling which granted a new trial to William. Bernhardt from Cincinnati.

- – -

THREE UNIDENTIFIED PERSONS RUN OVER BY TRAIN

Hickory, Miss., June 3rd
Coroners attempted to identify the bodies of three well dressed men today. Their mangled bodies were found near the tracks of the “Alabama and Vicksburg Railway” in the early hours of the morning. Two of the bodies were found close together about three miles west of Hickory. The third body was found approximately one and a half miles further westward. Wallets which were found near the bodies gave no identification.

- – -

BANK PRESIDENT COMMITS SUICIDE

San Francisco, June 3rd

George H. Luchsinger, President of the “Humboldt Savings Bank,” one of the biggest financial institutions in the state of California, committed suicide today. The cause of death was gas inhalation. The officials and directors of the bank stated that an inquiry into the bank’s books determined that the finances of the bank are in the best of shape. Mr. Luchsinger was 56 years old. He leaves behind a widow and a son.

- – -

FUNERAL CORTEGE STRUCK BY TRAIN

Buffalo, N.Y., June 3rd 

Mrs L. Carr, 62 years old, was killed instantly and her spouse sustained life-threatening injuries as their carriage, in which was traveling in a funeral procession, was struck by a train of the “Pennsylvania Railway” as it was crossing the railroad tracks in Chaffot.

- – -

SICKNESS PREVENTION DAY

Indianapolis, Ind., June 2nd

Governor Ralston will soon proclaim the entire state of Indiana to observe “Sickness Prevention Day” for the month of October. The idea comes from the Indiana “Society for Combating Tuberculosis”. This move towards combating disease will likely involve sixty branches of the “Anti-Tuberculosis Society”, the state sanitary and the educational authorities, including schools, colleges and all public and civil associations in the state.

THE KEY TO THE RESOLUTION OF THE MEXICAN PROBLEMS LIES IN THE HANDS OF GENERAL CARRANZA

Gen. Carranza is in possession of a dispatch from the South American mediator. The continuation of the peace conference depends on his answer. Washington officials wait in suspense for his reply.

Niagara Falls, Ont. June 3rd

The mediation conference waits for an answer from General Carranza this evening. General Carranza the High Commander of the Constitutionalist troops in Mexico. He has possession of a message from three South American diplomats who opened the door for Constitutionalist representation in the current conference. It depends on his word whether the entire Mexican problem will be settled by diplomatic means or whether the Constitutionalists will continue their struggle to Mexico City by force of arms.

The mediators have cleared the way for the participation of the Constitutionalists in a dignified manner. The United States hopes that they accept this participation. A rejection of the invitation may potentially result in the withdrawal of moral support the Washington government provided to the Constitutionalist cause.

The mediators were hopeful this evening that General Carranza would send his delegates here. The mediators did not believe that the proceedings would be prolonged indefinitely. They instead have the opposite belief that a peaceful resolution can be reached more quickly because all parties in the Mexican controversy will be participating in establishing the peace program. Neither the Mexican nor the American delegates proceeded today with the conference. It may be said that all authoritative figures here would like to see the Constitutionalists enter the negotiating with reconciliatory spirit. The Constitutionalists will experience neither technical nor other hinderances on the part of the Huerta delegates.

The mediators stated that the note to Carranza will not be made public at this moment out of courtesy and consideration for General Carranza’s opposition. An answer is not expected for another two days. However, people are hopeful that his answer will be favorable.

The mediators are willing to discuss the interests of the Constitutionalists in a fair manner and with special regard in light of the fact that the Constitutionalists control a large part of Mexico now and are therefore represent the most important element in the problem.  The dominant view here is that the Constitutionalists are reluctant to approve the mediation due to a misconception of the nature of the mediation proceedings. There is no intention to negotiate issues concerning the land. The American delegates have never suggested any plan to remedy the agrarian troubles and also have raised no such demand to do this. The American government and the mediators only wish that the provisional government be morally obliged to address the land question and to resolve it in a manner such that they all interests might be satisfied equally.

Although the land question is not the sole cause of unrest in Mexico, it has consistently been the motive for the revolutions.

Should the Constitutionalists refuse to take part in the negotiations and the continuation/prosecution…

(Continuation on page 6.)

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